Languages

The Martyr’s Monument

martyr is someone who suffers persecution and death for advocating, renouncing, refusing to renounce, or refusing to advocate a belief or cause as demanded by an external party. This refusal to comply with the presented demands results in the punishment or execution of the martyr by the oppressor. Originally applied only to those who suffered for their religious beliefs, the term has come to be used in connection with people imprisoned or killed for espousing a political cause.

Most martyrs are considered holy or are respected by their followers, becoming symbols of exceptional leadership and heroism in the face of difficult circumstances. Martyrs play significant roles in religions. Similarly, martyrs have had notable effects in secular life, including such figures as Socrates, among other political and cultural examples.

Jihad and its relation with the mosques

Jihad is an Arabic word which literally means striving or struggling, especially with a praiseworthy aim. It can have many shades of meaning in an Islamic context, such as struggle against one's evil inclinations, an exertion to convert unbelievers, or efforts toward the moral betterment of society, though it is most frequently associated with war.

The term jihad is often rendered in English as "Holy War", and Jihad is referred to as the sixth pillar of Islam, though this designation is not commonly recognized.

The word jihad appears frequently in the Quran with and without military connotations, often in the idiomatic expression "striving in the path of God. Islamic jurists and other ulema of the classical era understood the obligation of jihad predominantly in a military sense. They developed an elaborate set of rules pertaining to jihad, including prohibitions on harming those who are not engaged in combat. Modernist Islamic scholars have emphasized defensive and non-military aspects of jihad, some Islamists have advanced aggressive interpretations that go beyond the classical theory.

Jihad is classified into inner ("greater") jihad, which involves a struggle against one's own base impulses, and external ("lesser") jihad, which is further subdivided into jihad of the pen/tongue (debate or persuasion) and jihad of the sword

 

 

 

The idea was to visualize the incident of linking the martyr’s leg with his Oqal, and his insistence on martyrdom or victory, these are the attributes and characteristics of our heroes who sacrificed their lives and stood firmly in the battlefield. The idea has been simplified, and it shows part of the martyr’s leg, tied with the headband. The total height of the object is 3 meters. (needs additional details)